Why I keyword

In October, I received an e-mail from an editor looking for an image of a crane operator to support a story they were doing on operator training. Usually, in the assignments I have shot, the crane is the subject and due to the size of the crane the operator is a very tiny part of the image…if he/she can be seen at all. I had till the next morning to get back to the editor so that evening I filtered my images and from 10,000 plus finished images of cranes I had two featuring crane operators where I had releases. I found them in about 5 minutes and had them off to the editor that night. Four weeks later, the image was published. I never would have found those two images from 10,000 plus shot over the past decade had it not been that I had attached some basic keywords to those images. If you keyword when you input your images from your cards, it soon becomes a habit. A habit that just got reenforced by this experience.


Sometimes its not what you think…

In shooting the cover for the August issue of American Crane and Transport, I had what I thought was a slam dunk idea for a cover. Literally outside my 16th floor office was a 51 story building going up. I started shooting the building from the time the tower crane was assembled. What a unique shot I thought. Straight down on a Tower Crane, a perspective most people don’t see or get to shoot. Up 2,3,8,12 stories and I shot all the way, along with the conventional from the ground up shot. When it came time to submit, in went the “unique perspective shots” along with the traditional. Then the call came from the editor. “We are really struggling to select one from several we like, would you like to be the tie-breaker?” So I selected my favorites and had a couple of hours to get back to them. In the end, I picked the traditional shot. Why not the “unique perspective”. The image was to highlight the magazine’s lead story, key word “story”. The more I looked at the tower crane below me in the “unique perspective” shots, the more I realized that they just didn’t have the impact of standing under a 12 story tower crane in operation – that’s what your mind expects to see and if it doesn’t see that it doesn’t scream Tower Crane. So in supporting the magazine’s lead story, we needed to make the reader’s mind identify quickly that this was the tower crane issue, not struggle to figure out why we were looking down on the crane. It was an important lesson for me and a reminder that its about telling the story, not just about capturing what was a unique perspective. In the end the story won out, as it should have.


Double Truck

I was pleased to discover that the May/June edition of the Canadian publication, Service Truck, featured 16 of my images in a double truck ( a pair of facing pages in a magazine) article written by Dan Anderson for their column Spec My Truck. The idea for the article began over a year ago when I met the editor at the ConExpo trade show in Germany and pitched the idea of the article to him. While this regular column normally features an individual and describes how they have customized their service truck to fit their specific job, Dan interviewed the head of product support and wrote about how a company approaches customizing their entire fleet to meet the tasks required to service cranes. The editor requested a lot of images with specific vehicle details and it was fun spending a few hours with several fleet vehicles to come up with a fresh approach to capturing the story.



American Cranes and Transport – March Cover

Cover-1I was flattered to have an image from the last ConExpo selected for the March cover of American Cranes and Transport, which also included their show guide for this year’s ConExpo. One of the largest construction equipment shows in the world, ConExpo occurs in Las Vegas once every three years and covers approximately 10 football fields of a variety of construction equipment. Thousands of copies of the magazine were given out to the roughly 400,000 attendees and it was pretty cool to see stacks of the magazine on display at their booth with this cover.



American Cranes and Transport

August is the annual tower crane issue for American Cranes and Transport.  I had been following the construction of a new building right along the FDR Drive and had shot a number of images as the building was going up in its early stages.  Tower cranes can be challenging to photograph when they are 20 or 30 stories in the air.  I was pleased to learn that one of the images was selected for the cover.

act_august_cover-1-of-1


American Cranes and Transport

The June issue of American Cranes and Transport is out.

June is their Annual ACT 100 issue and I was excited to have had the image I posted a while back, the “ass-shot” of the Terex AC-250, selected for the cover.

It’s also the culmination of quite a bit of work that I completed for them relating to Bauma, the largest construction equipment tradeshow in the world, held every three years in Munich. Even with all-access photo credentials, it was a challenge to shoot Bauma for a number of reasons. The weather certainly did not cooperate all the time, although the changing weather patterns created great clouds. Further, the show is BIG. The location of tradeshow booths can take up to a half hour to walk from one to another given the size of the show. And like any tradeshow, the amount of equipment packed into the show presents constant challenges in isolating specific manufacturers or products. And of course, with cranes being outside, time of day to take advantage of available light (when there was available light) created a shooting schedule in the morning and afternoon and, of course, the booths were never near each other. I set my personal best on my Fitbit the first day and then blew threw that on Day Three. Balancing between other commitments at the show and shooting added to the fun as well as the need to have all images processed within three days of the show ending – thank you Photo Mechanic and Adobe.

In addition to images that were selected for articles related to Bauma that appear in the June issue, “Dimmitt’s Bauma” is a 4-page selection of images from my submissions that were selected by the editor of American Crane and Transport to tell the story of Bauma from a photographer’s point of view. The article also includes a short article that I was asked to write as to how I approach a show of that size as a photographer. While I was aware that an article was in the works, the proofs arrived on my birthday and it was a great present to view what had been selected and how the article was laid out.

ACT June 16.pdfACT June 16.pdf


A Different Perspective

Terex_AC250_Crane-2

My friend, Moose, calls them ass shots. In his case its usually aircraft. The bottom line is reminding yourself to try different perspectives. As he says, make the common, uncommon. Recently I was looking at a new Terex AC-250-1 All Terrain Crane. It was overcast, the crane was in the middle of an inspection, so “normal” shots were out of the question. So I tried a different perspective.